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Wheelchair races

The 2022 TCS London Marathon wheelchair races

2022 elite men's wheelchair field

  • Born: 23 February 1979

    Marathon best: 1:22:09, Boston (2017)

    London Marathon record: 2008 – 9th (1:37:26), 2009 – 8th (1:37:38), 2010 – 12th (2:14:22), 2012 – 15th (1:40:01), 2013 – 21st (1:45:27), 2014 – 13th (1:36:45), 2015 – 29th (1:54:23), 2016 – 11th (1:38:35), 2017 – 5th (1:31:09), 2018 – 17th (1:36:10), 2019 – 21st (1:48:47), 2021 – 16th (1:42:02)

    Notes: Botello is the Spanish record holder and third fastest European ever on a ‘legal’ course behind Swiss pair Heinz Frei and Marcel Hug. He injured his spine in a bicycle accident in 2002 and started racing in 2003.
  • Born: 16 June 1992

    Marathon best: 1:32:49, Seoul (2019)

    London Marathon record: 2015 – 36th (2:16:59), 2017 – 31st (1:44:51), 2018 – 21st (1:42:10), 2021 – 13th

    Notes: Married to 2018 Commonwealth Games para-triathlon champion Jade Jones, Hall finished 13th at last year’s London Marathon.
  • Born: 30 March 1974

    Marathon best:
    1:21:14, Boston (2014)

    London Marathon record:
    2010 – 4th (1:40:59), 2011 – DNF, 2012 – 10th (1:36:00), 2013 – 6th (1:31:31), 2014 – 4th (1:32:43), 2015 – 7th (1:32:22), 2016 – 8th (1:35:37), 2017 – 6th (1:31:09), 2018 – 12th (1:33:32), 2020 – 6th (1:36:11), 2021 – 9th (1:35:56)

    Notes:
    The 2014 Berlin and 2015 Tokyo Marathon champion, ‘Hoki’ injured his spine in a motorcycle accident in March 2000 and began racing in 2002.
  • Born: 16 January 1986

    Marathon best: 1:18:04 Boston (2017)

    London Marathon record: 2010 – 2nd (1:36:07), 2011 – 11th (1:35:35), 2012 – 2nd (1:32:27), 2013 – 2nd (1:31:29), 2014 – 1st (1:32:41), 2015 – DNF, 2016 – 1st (1:35:19), 2017 – 2nd (1:31:07), 2018 – 2nd (1:31:15), 2019 – 2nd (1:33:42), 2020 – 3rd (1:36:08), 2021 – 1st (1:26:27)

    Other Abbott World Marathon Majors: Tokyo: 2019 – 1st, 2022 – 1st; Boston: 2015 – 1st, 2016 – 1st, 2017 – 1st, 2018 – 1st, Berlin: 2011 – 1st, 2012 – 1st, 2016 – 1st, 2017 – 1st, 2019 – 1st, 2021 – 1st; Chicago: 2016 – 1st; New York: 2013 – 1st, 2016 – 1st, 2017 – 1st, 2021 – 1st

    Marathons in major championships:
    Paralympics: 2008 – DNF, 2012 – 2nd (1:30:21), 2016 – 1st (1:26:16), 2020 – 1st (1:24:02); Worlds: 2006 – 4th (1:29:57), 2011 – DNF, 2013 – 1st (1:28:44), 2015 – DNF, 2019 – 2nd (1:33:42)

    Notes: Reigning champion Hug reasserted himself as the number one men’s wheelchair racer in the world last year by winning the Tokyo Paralympics marathon as well as the titles in London, Berlin and New York. He followed that up by winning the Tokyo Marathon, the opening Abbott World Marathon Major of the year, in February. He has won the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series on three separate occasions. Hug was born with spina bifida and grew up on a farm in Pfyn, Thurgau. He started competing at the age of 10 and is nicknamed the ‘Silver Bullet’ due to his shiny helmet.
  • Born: 11 September 1992

    Marathon best:
    1:29:31

    London Marathon record:
    N/A

    Notes:
    A double Paralympian and 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games 1500m champion, Lappin is a specialist over the shorter distances.
  • Born: 7 June 1982

    Marathon best:
    1:25:06, Boston (2017)

    London Marathon record:
    2011 – 12th (1:43:19), 2013 –18th (1:40:54), 2014 – 19th (1:39:42), 2015 – 10th (1:34:21), 2016 – 10th (1:37:02), 2017 – 24th (1:36:57), 2018 – 13th (1:33:36), 2019 – 14th (1:39:58), 2021 – 12th (1:36:00)

    Notes:
    Lawson is an experienced British athlete who won a bronze medal in the 2018 Commonwealth Games marathon in Gold Coast, Australia.
  • Born: 19 January 1980

    Marathon best: 1:22:10, Boston (2017)

    London Marathon record: 2011 – 10th (1:34:41), 2012 – 13th (1:36:56), 2013 – 11th (1:36:34), 2014 – 6th (1:35:05), 2015 – 8th (1:33:22), 2017 – 14th (1:31:12), 2018 – 6th (1:31:24), 2019 – 7th (1:37:32), 2021 – 8th (1:35:55)

    Notes: Madera is a regular top 10 finisher at the London Marathon with his highest position being sixth, which he achieved in both 2014 and 2018.
  • Born: 14 January 1986

    Marathon best: 1:22:23, Duluth (2019)

    London Marathon record: 2015 – 23rd (1:46:47), 2016 – 15th (1:38:38), 2017 – 19th (1:33:41), 2018 – 19th (1:36:10), 2019 – 13th (1:39:41), 2021 – 11th (1:35:57)

    Notes: Monahan was injured in a car accident in 2007 and started racing in 2013 when he placed third in the Dublin Marathon. He won the Belfast Marathon in 2014.
  • Born: 4 May 1986

    Marathon best:
    1:20:59, Duluth (2019)

    London Marathon record:
    2013 – 20th (1:44:24), 2015 – 26th (1:50:47), 2016 – 7th (1:35:33), 2017 – 7th (1:31:10), 2019 – 9th (1:37:34), 2021 – 5th (1:31:36)

    Notes:
    Pike has been steadily improving each year. He finished fifth at last year’s London Marathon, his best finish in a race he has done on six occasions. He was the fastest T54 racer in the world in 2019 thanks to his superb winning time of 1:20:59 at the Grandma’s Marathon in Duluth. Pike injured his spine at the age of 13 when he was accidentally shot during a deer-hunting trip in Virginia. He is also a cross country skier and biathlete.
  • Born: 10 June 1991

    Marathon best: N/A

    London Marathon record: N/A

    Notes: A Dutch Paralympic hero, Plat is a double paratriathlon gold medallist with victories at the 2016 and 2020 Paralympics. At The Tokyo 2020 Games, he also won gold medals in handcycling in both the road race and time trial disciplines. This will be his first time competing in a marathon race.
  • Born: 3 August 1998

    Marathon best:
    1:21:36, Boston (2019)

    London Marathon record:
    2017 – 26th (1:39:43), 2018 – 3rd (1:31:16), 2019 – 1st (1:33:38), 2021 – 2nd (1:29:27)
    Other Abbott World Marathon Majors: Boston: 2019 – 1st, 2022 – 1st, Chicago: 2018 – 1st, 2019 – 1st, 2021 – 1st; New York: 2019 – 1st, 2020 – 1st

    Marathons in major championships:
    Worlds: 2019 – 1st (1:33:38)

    Notes:
    Romanchuk was the dominant wheelchair racer on the marathon circuit in 2019 when he won the Boston, London, Chicago and New York titles and took the AbbottWMM Series XII crown. The Covid-19 pandemic slowed his progress, but he has returned to form over the past year, winning the Chicago Marathon last October as well as the 2022 Boston Marathon. Born in Baltimore with spina bifida, he now lives in Urbana where he is part of the Illinois Wheelchair Racing Team. Nicknamed ‘Rocket Man’, he is known for his long, powerful arms – his wingspan measures two metres.
  • Born: 19 November 1986

    Marathon best: 1:24:27, Boston (2017)

    London Marathon record: 2014 – 11th (1:36:45), 2016 – 5th (1:35:24), 2017 – 11th (1:31:11), 2019 – 17th (1:39:59), 2020 – 9th (1:59:45,) 2021 – 15th (1:41:11)

    Notes: Senbeta raced for USA at the Rio Paralympics and has a best-placed finish of 5th at the London Marathon (2016). An agricultural and bio-engineering student, he is coached by Adam Bleakney and competes for the University of Illinois Wheelchair Racing Team.
  • Born: 27 November 1989

    Marathon best:
    1:29:44, Berlin (2018)

    London Marathon record:
    2015 – 20th (1:46:17), 2016 – 18th (1:38:40), 2017 – 17th (1:33:40), 2018 – 11th (1:33:24), 2019 – 11th (1:38:33), 2021 – 6th (1:35:54)

    Notes:
    Smith has finished on the podium at a World Marathon Major event on three occasions, with second place finishes in New York in 2018 and Boston this year, plus a third place in Berlin in 2018. He made his first Paralympic team in Tokyo, becoming the first ever Romany gipsy to do so. He raced in the marathon and finished 10th in 1:32:25. He also won a silver medal in the 2018 Commonwealth Games marathon in Gold Coast, Australia.
  • Born: 14 June 1994

    Marathon best:
    1:21:52, Tokyo (2020)

    London Marathon record:
    2017 – 16th (1:31:12), 2018 – 8th (1:31:25), 2019 – 3rd (1:33:51)

    Notes:
    Suzuki won the 2020 Tokyo Marathon in a personal best and course record time of 1:21:52. This followed a successful 2019 when he placed third in London and second in Oita, where he finished behind Hug for the second year in a row but ahead of Romanchuk, clocking a best of 1:22:55. He injured his spine in a car accident when he was eight months old and took up para athletics at school.
  • Born: 4 April 1973

    Marathon best:
    1:18:04, Boston (2017)

    London Marathon record:
    2000 – 2nd (1:41:53), 2006 – DNF, 2007 – 4th (1:33:46), 2008 – 6th (1:34:25), 2009 – 3rd (1:28:58), 2010 – 6th (1:44:11), 2012 – 11th (1:36:20), 2013 – 3rd (1:31:30), 2014 – 3rd (1:32:42), 2015 – 5th (1:31:38), 2016 – 4th (1:35:23), 2017 – 4th (1:31:08), 2018 – 24th (1:44:49), 2019 – 6th (1:37:32)

    Notes:
    Veteran Van Dyk is one of the greatest wheelchair athletes of all time, winning multiple times in New York, Boston and Chicago, and yet he has never triumphed in London. Born without lower legs because of congenital birth defects, Van Dyk was a swimmer before he took up wheelchair racing. He lives in Paarl with his wife Suzanne and two daughters, Lexi and Sunei.
  • Born: 23 November 1991

    Marathon best: 1:28:01, Tokyo (2017)

    London Marathon record: 2020 – 4th (1:36:08), 2021 – 7th (1:35:55)

    Notes: The winner of the 2017 Tokyo Marathon, Watanabe has a best-placed finish of fourth at the London Marathon, which he achieved at the 2020 elite-only race around St James’s Park.
  • Born: 5 June 1979

    Marathon best:
    1:26:17, Boston (2016)

    London Marathon record:
    2000 – 4th (1:47:11), 2001 – 3rd (1:50:55), 2002 – 1st (1:39:44), 2003 – 2nd (1:34:48), 2004 – 2nd (1:36:56), 2005 – 3rd (1:36:03), 2006 – 1st (1:29:48), 2007 – 1st (1:30:49), 2008 – 1st (1:33:36), 2009 – 2nd (1:28:57), 2010 – 3rd (1:37:01), 2011 – 1st (1:30:05), 2012 – 1st (1:32:26), 2013 – 5th (1:31:31), 2014 – 2nd (1:32:42), 2015 – 2nd (1:31:32), 2016 – 3rd (1:35:21), 2017 – 1st (1:31:06), 2018 – 1st (1:31:15), 2019 – 5th (1:37:3) 2020 – 2nd (1:36:06), 2021 – 3rd (1:31:33)

    Other Abbott World Marathon Majors:
    Berlin: 2015 – 1st; New York – 2010 – 1st

    Marathons in major championships:
    Paralympics: 2012 – 1st (1:30:20), 2016 – DNF; Worlds: 2020 (2021) – 5th (1:29:45), 2006 – DNF, 2011 – DNS, 2015 – 2nd (1:31:32), 2019 – 5th (1:37:32)

    Notes:
    Weir is the most successful elite athlete in the history of the London Marathon, with an incredible eight victories to his name. Incredibly, 2022 will also be his 23rd consecutive London Marathon since his debut in 2000. He won the Mini London Marathon seven times as a junior and is still the only male athlete, wheelchair or able-bodied, to win both mini and senior events. He is a six-time Paralympic gold medallist, having won two at the Beijing 2008 Games and four at London 2012 Games where he was nicknamed ‘Weirwolf’. He is coached by Jenny Archer and together they run the Weir Archer Academy in Surrey. He was born with a severed spinal cord and started racing at the age of eight.

2022 elite women's wheelchair field

  • Born: 3 May 1980

    Marathon best: 1:46:44

    London Marathon record:
    2009 – 5th (1:50:43), 2013 – 4th (1:50:43), 2014 – 5th (1:51:01), 2015 – 6th (1:56:20), 2016 – 9th (1:56:46), 2019 – 11th (1:56:16)

    Notes: A veteran Australian who competed in her first Paralympics in Atlanta in 1996, Dawes has been selected for every Games since – a total of seven Paralympics.
  • Born: 11 April 1995

    Marathon best: N/A

    London Marathon record: N/A

    Notes: Debrunner was the gold medallist in the 400m at the 2019 World Para Athletics Championships.
  • Born: 24 November 1993

    Marathon best:
    1:39:22, Chicago (2017)

    London Marathon record: 2013 – 8th (1:53:44), 2018 – 1st (1:42:58), 2019 – 3rd (1:49:44)
    Marathons in major championships: Paralympics: 2020 – 1st (1:38:11); Commonwealth Games: 2018 – 1st (1:44:00)

    Notes: Reigning Paralympic champion de Rozario became the first Australian woman to win the London Marathon when she clinched victory in 2018. She claimed the biggest win of her career with her Paralympic marathon victory in Tokyo last year – a gold medal to add to the one she won in the Commonwealth Games in 2018. She followed that up by winning the New York Marathon last November.
  • Born: 20 November 1989

    Marathon best: 1:45:19, Oita (2018)

    London Marathon record: 2019 – 12th (1:56:19), 2021 – 7th (1:50:13)

    Notes: De Souza had the best year of her career in 2021, claiming top 10 finishes in London, New York, Chicago and Boston and representing Brazil at the Paralympics.
  • Born: 26 September 1989

    Marathon best: 1:47:06

    London Marathon record: 2020 – 4th (2:02:38), 2021 – 8th (1:56:59)

    Notes: Eachus has a best-placed finish of fourth at the 2020 London Marathon, which was the elite-only race around St James’s Park.
  • Born: 31 January 1997

    Marathon best: 1:37:02, Duluth (2019)

    London Marathon record: 2020 – 3rd (1:52:16), 2021 – 9th (2:03:08)

    Notes: Fesemyer finished third in her London Marathon debut in 2020 on the elite-only course around St James’s Park, following that up with a ninth place finish last year. Born a triplet without a left leg and hip socket because of a rare congenital disease called proximal femoral focal deficiency, she got involved in wheelchair track racing in 2013, having grown up playing basketball with a prosthetic. She trains with the University of Illinois team under Adam Bleakney.
  • Born: 8 March 1987

    Marathon best: 1:50:14

    London Marathon record:
    N/A

    Notes: Hoang is a US Paralympian who finished second at the Chicago Marathon and third at the Boston Marathon last year.
  • Born: 19 August 1994

    Marathon best: 1:42:12

    London Marathon record: 2021 – 2nd (1:44:51)

    Notes: The teenager is a rising star of Paralympic sport. She finished runner-up at last year’s London Marathon in just her second race over the distance. Last year she also won two gold medals in the 400m and 5000m at the European Championships in Poland, as well as silver medals in the 100m and 800m.
  • Born: 20 February 1991

    Marathon best: 1:41:39

    London Marathon record: 2019 – 10th (1:52:13), 2021 – 5th (1:50:07)

    Notes: A Brazilian Paralympian, Rocha finished fifth at last year’s London Marathon, a week after finishing third in the Berlin Marathon. She has also represented Brazil in skiing at the Winter Paralympics.
  • Born: 16 May 1991

    Marathon best: 1:30:42, Duluth (2019)

    London Marathon record: 2013 – 7th (1:50:47), 2014 – 4th (1:51:01), 2015 – 5th (1:47:06), 2016 – 7th (1:52:50), 2017 – 3rd (1:47:37), 2018 – 3rd (1:43:00), 2019 – 13th (2:02:00)

    Notes: Scaroni set a world record of 10:38:46 for the 5000m in Notwill, Switzerland, earlier this year, less than 10 months after being hit by a car during training and fracturing her vertebra. Scaroni was injured in the accident just weeks after winning her first Paralympic gold medal at the Tokyo Paralympics, where she won gold in the 5000m. The Tokyo Games marked the third time she had represented USA at the Paralympics. She was a runner-up at this year’s Boston Marathon and will return to London for the first time since 2019.
  • Born: 5 December 1984

    Marathon best:
    1:28:17, Boston (2017)

    London Marathon record:
    2014 – 2nd (1:46:44), 2015 – 2nd (1:43:56), 2016 – 2nd (1:44:15), 2017 – 1st (1:39:57), 2018 – 4th (1:43:01), 2019 – 1st (1:44:09), 2020 – 2nd (1:41:29), 2021 – 1st (1:39:52)

    Notes:
    Schär is a three-time London Marathon winner and the course record holder, with a total of 19 Abbott World Marathon Majors victories to her name to date. She became the fastest woman wheelchair marathon racer of all time when she clocked 1:28:17 in Boston in 2017, beating the previous best by almost six minutes. In Oita in 2020 she then broke her own official world record by a minute, clocking a time of 1:35:42. She was injured in an accident in 1993 and started wheelchair sport at the age of 14.
  • Born: 15 September 1974

    Marathon best: 1:34:06, Boston (2011)

    London Marathon record: 2010 – 1st (1:52:33), 2012 – 2nd (1:53:04), 2014 – 3rd (1:46:45), 2015 – 7th (1:56:48), 2016 – 3rd (1:45:28)

    Notes: The 2010 London Marathon champion and 2011 world champion, Tsuchida won five Boston Marathons in a row from 2007 to 2011 and has also won the Tokyo title nine times. In addition, she has two Paralympic marathon medals to her name.
  • Born: 12 September 1986

    Marathon best: 1:45:22, Oita (2018)

    London Marathon record: 2019 – 14th (2:03:37), 2021 – 11th (2:06:02)

    Notes: Wheeler is a former Los Angeles champion who has clinched top 10 places in Chicago and New York in the past. She suffered a spinal cord injury aged one due to physical abuse.
  • Born: 4 June 1986

    Marathon best: 1:37:44, Padua (2008)

    London Marathon record: 2005 – 2nd (1:57:03), 2006 – 2nd (2:04:37), 2007 – 1st (1:50:40), 2008 – 3rd (2:01:59), 2009 – 6th (1:50:46), 2010 – 6th (2:45:40), 2011 – 2nd (1:46:31), 2012 – 1st (1:49:10), 2013 – 5th (1:50:44), 2014 – 6th (1:54:52), 2015 – DNF, 2016 – DNF, 2020 – DNF, 2021 – 6th (1:50:11)

    Notes: Woods is a two-time London Marathon champion, British record holder and 2012 Paralympic silver medallist. A former Mini London Marathon winner, she took her second senior title in 2012 with a commanding victory. She has won three Paralympic medals in total, including two silvers (1500m, 2008 and marathon, 2012) and one bronze (5000m, 2008). She took two years out of the sport between 2018 and 2019 following the birth of her son, Leo.

The Flying 400 at the 2022 TCS London Marathon

The Flying 400, an exciting competition within the elite wheelchair races, will again form part of the 2022 TCS London Marathon.

First introduced in 2019, the Flying 400 is a sprint competition that will see a $10,500 prize fund and Abbott World Marathon Majors bonus points awarded to the fastest wheelchair athletes in the menโ€™s and womenโ€™s races to complete a specified 400 metre time trial section of the TCS London Marathon course.

The Flying 400 will start just after the 20km point (12.5 miles) on the north side of Tower Bridge and finish on East Smithfield. The fastest athlete between these two points of the course in both the menโ€™s and womenโ€™s wheelchair races will win $3,000, with the runner-up receiving $1,500 and third place $750.

The elite wheelchair men are expected to reach the Flying 400 start point at approximately 09:32, with the elite wheelchair women due to arrive at the point at 09:46.

The Flying 400 was won in 2019 by Daniel Romanchuk (USA) and Manuela Schรคr (SUI), who both went on to win the overall race. In 2021, Romanchuk won again but lost out in the overall race to Marcel Hug (SUI), while Schรคr again won both the Flying 400 and the overall title.


Abbott World Marathon Majors

Abbott World Marathon Majors is the collective of the TCS London Marathon, BMW Berlin Marathon, Bank of America Chicago Marathon, TCS New York City Marathon, Tokyo Marathon and B.A.A. Boston Marathon.

Athletes score points for their finishing place in each race in an Abbott World Marathon Majors Series, with the top three male and female marathon runners and wheelchair athletes at the end of each cycle receiving prize money.